Hummus

Hummus is a Middle Eastern dip or spread made from cooked, mashed chickpeas, blended with tahini, lemon juice, salt, and garlic. The commercial versions and restaurant versions usually also contain olive oil (sometimes, they’re swimming in it!), which I avoid because it adds little nutrition besides fat and calories. If you want, you can add a few whole olives as you blend.

That said, I think that every restaurant that serves sandwiches or appetizers ought to offer hummus. To me, it is the best sandwich ingredient outside of bread. (Or inside of bread, as the case may be!)

Hummus is high in iron and vitamin C and also has significant amounts of folate and vitamin B6. The chickpeas make it a good source of protein and dietary fiber. My recipe has 1.83 grams of monounsaturated fat per serving.

Hummus

2 cups or 16 oz can of chickpeas or garbanzo beans

1/4 cup lemon juice

2 Tablespoons tahini

2 cloves garlic, crushed

1/2 teaspoon salt

  1. Drain chickpeas and set aside liquid.
  2. Combine tahini and lemon juice in blender or food processor and blend until creamy.
  3. Add remaining ingredients, a little at a time.
  4. Blend for 3-5 minutes on low until thoroughly mixed and smooth.
  5. Add liquid from can or cooking pot, a little at a time, if too thick.
  6. Serve immediately with fresh, warm or toasted pita bread, or cover and refrigerate.

Servings: 5

Preparation Time: 10 minutes

Nutrition Facts

Percent daily values based on the Reference Daily Intake (RDI) for a 2000 calorie diet.

Nutrition information calculated from recipe ingredients.

Amount Per Serving

Nutrient

Amount

DV

manganese

0.98mg

49%
folate 151.49mcg 38%
fiber

7.01g

28%
sodium

498.98mg

21%
copper

0.42mg

21%
phosphorus

196.18mg

20%
protein

8.69g

17%
iron

3.08mg

17%
thiamine

0.19mg

13%
magnesium

47.78mg

12%
vitamin C

7.44mg

12%
zinc

1.63mg

11%
fat

6.2g

10%
Calories

184.7

9%

carbohydrates

25.62g

9%

potassium

291.45mg

8%

calcium

75.94mg

8%

selenium

5.84mcg

8%

vitamin B6

0.15mg

8%

riboflavin

0.09mg

5%

vitamin K

3.31mcg

4%

niacin

0.86mg

4%

vitamin E

0.33mg

3%

pantothenic acid

0.32mg

3%

vitamin A

28.22IU

<1%

cholesterol

0mg

0%

 


This blog uses the latest nutritional data available from the USDA (United States Department of Agriculture), and the FDA (United States Food and Drug Administration), as well as nutritional data provided by food growers and manufacturers about their products. We believe the information on this blog to be accurate. However, we are not responsible for typographical or other errors. Nutrition information for recipes is calculated by Living Cookbook based on the ingredients in each recipe based on statistical averages. Nutrition may vary based on methods of preparation, origin and freshness of ingredients, and other factors.

This blog is not a substitute for the services of a trained health professional. Although we provide nutritional information, the information on this blog is for informational purposes only. No information offered by or through this blog shall be construed as or understood to be medical advice or care. None of the information on this blog should be used to diagnose or treat any health problem or disease. Consult with a health care provider before taking any product or using any information on this blog. Please discuss any concerns with your health care provider.

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